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Child Find

ASPIRA 
2018-2019 School Year 

Annual Public Notice of Special Education Services and Programs and Rights for  Students with Disabilities  And  Notification of Rights under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 

All children with disabilities residing in the Commonwealth, regardless of the severity of their  disabilities, and who are in need of special education and related services, are to be located,  identified and evaluated. This responsibility is required by a federal law called the Individuals  with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, 20 U.S.C. 1400 ​et. seq.
​ (“IDEA”). 

Chapter 711 of Title 22 (“Chapter 711”) of the Pennsylvania Code requires the publication of a  notice to parents regarding public awareness activities sufficient to inform parents of ABCCS  (“the Charter School”) of available special education services and programs and how to request  those services and programs as well, as of systematic screening activities that lead to the  identification, location and evaluation of children with disabilities enrolled in the Charter  School. 

In addition, the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (“FERPA”), which  protects confidentiality, requires educational agencies to notify parents annually of their  confidentiality rights. 

The Charter School fulfills its duties with this Annual Notice and has incorporated several  sections of the PaTTAN Procedural Safeguards Notice and other applicable guidelines from the  Pennsylvania Department of Education (“PDE”) into the Board-approved Child Find Notice  and Policies and Procedures described below.     The Charter School directs parents to the procedural safeguards notice from PaTTAN  available at the Charter School’s main office for additional information regarding rights and  services.  Parents may contact the Charter School’s ​Chief Executive Officer or his/her designee ​​at any  time to request a copy of the Procedural Safeguards Notice or with any other questions about  special education services, screenings, policies, or procedures. The Procedural Safeguards  Notice is provided to parents of special education students by the Charter School once per  school year or: (1) upon initial referral or parent request for evaluation; (2) upon receipt of the  first State complaint under 34 CFR §§300.151 through 300.153 and upon receipt of the first due  process complaint under §300.507 in a school year; (3) when a decision is made to take a  disciplinary action that constitutes a change of placement of a child with a disability because of  a violation of a code of student conduct; and (4) upon parent request. [34 CFR §300.504(a)]. 

The purpose of this Annual Notice is to comply with the Charter School’s obligations under  Chapter 711 of Title 22 of the Pennsylvania Code and to describe: (1) the types of disabilities 
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that might qualify the child for special education; (2) the special education programs and  related services that are available; (3) the process by which the Charter School screens and  evaluates such students to determine eligibility; (4) the special rights that pertain to such  children and their parents or legal guardians; and (5) the confidentiality rights that pertain to  student information.  

Qualifying for Special Education Related Services  Under IDEA children qualify for special education and related services if they have one or more  of the following disabilities and, as a result, need special education and related services:  intellectual disability; hearing impairment, including deafness; speech or language impairment;  visual impairment, including blindness; emotional disturbance; orthopedic impairment; autism;  traumatic brain injury; other health impairment; specific learning disability; deaf-blindness; or  multiple disabilities. 

IDEA provides legal definitions of the disabilities that qualify a student for special education  and related services. Such definitions may differ from those terms used in medical or clinical  practice or common usage. 

Section 504 Services  Under Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (“Section 504”), some school-age  children with disabilities who do not meet the eligibility criteria outlined above might be  eligible for special protections and for adaptations and accommodations in instruction, facilities,  and activities. Children are entitled to such protections, adaptations, and accommodations if  they have a mental or physical disability that substantially limits or prohibits participation in or  access to an aspect of the school program and otherwise qualify under the applicable state and  federal laws, including Chapter 711 and Section 504. 

Charter School must ensure that qualified handicapped students have equal opportunity to  participate in the school’s program and activities to the maximum extent appropriate for each  individual student. In compliance with applicable state and federal laws, the Charter School  provides to each qualifying protected handicapped student without discrimination or cost to  the student or family, those related aids, services or accommodations which are needed to  provide equal opportunity to participate in and obtain the benefits of the school program and  activities to the maximum extent appropriate to the student’s abilities and to the extent required  by the laws. 

These services and protections for “protected handicapped students” may be distinct from those  applicable to eligible or thought-to-be eligible students. The Charter School or the parent may  initiate an evaluation if they believe a student is a protected handicapped student. For further  information on the evaluation procedures and provision of services to protected handicapped  students, parents should contact the school.       
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Least Restrictive Environment (“LRE”)  The Charter School ensures that children with disabilities are educated to the maximum extent  possible in the regular education environment or “least restrictive environment.” To the  maximum extent appropriate, students with disabilities are educated with students who are not  disabled. Special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of students with disabilities from  the general educational environment occurs only when the nature or severity of the disability is  such that education in general education classes, even with the use of supplementary aids and  services cannot be achieved satisfactorily. Programs and services available to students with  disabilities might include: (1) regular class placement with supplementary aides and services  provided as needed in that environment; (2) regular class placement for most of the school day  with itinerant services by a special education teacher either in or out of the regular classroom;  (3) regular class placement for most of the school day with instruction provided by a special  education teacher in a resource classroom; (4) part time special education class placement in a  regular public school or alternative setting; and (5) special education class placement or special  education services provided outside the regular class for most or all of the school day, either in  a regular public school or alternative setting. This is a team decision, which includes the  Charter School and the Parents. 

Depending on the nature and severity of the disability and least restrictive environment  consideration, the Charter School could provide special education programs and services as  determined appropriate by the Individualized Education Program (“IEP”) team, in locations  such as: (1) the classroom/building the child would attend if not disabled; (2) an alternative  regular class either in or outside the school; (3) a special education center operated by an  Intermediate Unit; (4) an approved private school or other private facility licensed to serve  children with disabilities; (5) a residential school; (6) approved out-of-state program; or (7) the  home. This is a team decision, which includes the Charter School and the Parents. 

Special education services are provided according to the educational needs of the child, not the  category of disability. Types of services that may be available, depending upon the child’s  disability and needs might include, but are not limited to: (1) learning support; (2) life skills  support; (3) emotional support; (4) deaf or hearing-impaired support; (5) blind or  visually-impaired support; (6) physical support; (7) autistic support; (8) multiple disabilities  support; (9) speech and language support; (10) extended school year support; and (11) vision  support. This is a team decision, which includes the Charter School and the Parents. 

Related services are designed to enable the child to participate in or access his or her program of  special education. Examples of related services that a child may require include, but are not  limited to: speech and language therapy; transportation; occupational therapy; physical  therapy; school nursing services; audiology services; parent counseling or training; certain  medical services for diagnostic or evaluation purposes; social work services; and recreation.  Some students may also be eligible for extended school year services if determined needed by  their IEP teams in accordance with Chapter 711 regulations. 


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The Charter School, in conjunction with parents, determines the type and intensity of special  education and related services that a particular child needs based on the unique program of  special education and related services that the Charter School develops for that child. The  child’s program is described in writing in an individualized education program, or “IEP,”  which is developed by an IEP team. The participants in the IEP team are dictated by IDEA. The  parents of the child have the right to be notified of and to be offered participation in all  meetings of their child’s IEP team. The IEP is revised as often as circumstances warrant, but  reviewed at least annually. The law requires that the program and placement of the child, as  described in the IEP, be reasonably calculated to ensure meaningful educational benefit to the  student. In accordance with IDEA, there may be situations in which the Charter School may  hold an IEP team meeting if the parents refuse or fail to attend the IEP team meeting. 

IEPs generally contain: (1) a statement of the student’s present levels; (2) a statement of  measurable annual goals established for the child; (3) a statement of how the child’s progress  toward meeting the annual goals will be measured and when periodic reports will be provided;  (4) a statement of the special education and related services and supplementary aids and  services, and a statement of the program modifications or supports for School personnel that  will be provided, if any; (5) an explanation of the extent, if any, to which the child will not  participate with nondisabled children in the regular class and in activities; (6) a statement of any  individual appropriate accommodations that are necessary to measure the performance of the  child on State and School assessments; and (7) the projected date for the beginning of the  services and modifications, and the anticipated frequency, location, and duration of those  services or modifications. 

Beginning no later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child turns 14, or younger if  determined appropriate by the IEP Team, and updated annually, thereafter, the IEP must  include appropriate measurable postsecondary goals and transition services needed to assist in  reaching those goals. Charter School must invite the child to the IEP team meeting at which the  transition plan is developed. 

Beginning no later than one year before the child reaches the age of majority under State law,  the IEP must include a statement that the child has been informed of the child’s rights, if any,  that will transfer to the child on reaching the age of majority. 

Screening and Evaluation Procedures for Children to Determine Eligibility    The Charter School has established a system of screening which may include pre-referral  intervention services to accomplish the following: 

A) Identification and provision of initial screening for students prior to referral for a special  education evaluation. 

B) Provision of peer support for teachers and other staff members to assist them in working  effectively with students in the general education curriculum. 

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C) Identification of students who may need special education services and programs. 


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The screening process includes: 

Hearing and vision screening in accordance with Section 1402 of the Public School Code of 1949  (24 P. S. § 14-1402) for the purpose of identifying students with hearing or vision difficulty so  that they can be referred for assistance or recommended for evaluation for special education. 

Screening at reasonable intervals to determine whether all students are performing based on  grade- appropriate standards in core academic subjects. 

The Charter School has established and implements procedures to locate, identify, and evaluate  children suspected of being eligible for special education. These procedures involve screening  activities that may also include, but are not limited to: review of data and student records;  motor screening; and speech and language screening. The Charter School assesses the current  achievement and performance of the child, designs school-based interventions, and assesses the  effectiveness of interventions. If the concern can be addressed without special education  services, or is the result of limited English proficiency or appropriate instruction, a  recommendation may be made for interventions other than a multidisciplinary team evaluation. 

The screening of a student by a teacher or specialist to determine appropriate instructional  strategies for curriculum implementation should not be considered to be an evaluation for  eligibility for special education and related services. Parents have the right to request a  multidisciplinary team evaluation at any time, regardless of the outcome of the screening  process. 

Except as indicated above or otherwise announced publicly, screening activities take place  on-going at periods throughout the school year. Screening is conducted at the Charter School,  unless other arrangements are necessary or arranged. 

If parents need additional information regarding the purpose, time, and location of screening  activities, they should call or write the Chief Executive Officer or his/her designee, 26  Wallace Ave, Downingtown, PA 19335, (484) 875-5400. 

Screening or pre-referral intervention activities may not serve as a bar to the right of a parent  to request an evaluation at any time, including prior to or during the conducting of screening  or pre-referral intervention activities.    Disproportionality  In accordance with Chapter 711, in the event that the Charter School would ever meet the  criteria in 34 CFR § 300.646 (relating to disproportionality), as established by the State  Department of Education, the services that would be required would then include: 

A) A verification that the student was provided with appropriate instruction in reading,  including the essential components of reading instruction (as defined in section 1208(3)  of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) (20 U.S.C.A. § 6368(3)), and  appropriate instruction in math. 
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B) For students with academic concerns, an assessment of the student's performance in  relation to State-approved grade-level standards.    C) For students with behavioral concerns, a systematic observation of the student's behavior  in the school environment where the student is displaying difficulty. 

D) A research-based intervention to increase the student's rate of learning or behavior  change based on the results of the assessments under paragraph (2) or (3), or both. 

E) Repeated assessments of achievement or behavior, or both, conducted at reasonable  intervals, reflecting formal monitoring of student progress during the interventions. 

F) A determination as to whether the student's assessed difficulties are the result of a lack  of instruction or limited English proficiency. 

G) A determination as to whether the student's needs exceed the functional ability of the  regular education program to maintain the student at an appropriate instructional level. 

H) Documentation that information about the student's progress as identified in paragraph  (5) was periodically provided to the student's parents. 

Evaluation  An evaluation under IDEA involves the use of a variety of assessment tools and strategies to  gather relevant functional, developmental, and academic information about the child, including  information provided by the parent that may assist in determining whether the child is a child  with a disability and the content of the child’s IEP. The Charter School does not use any single  measure or assessment as a sole criterion for determining whether a child is a child with a  disability and for determining an appropriate educational program for the child. Technically  sound instruments are used to assess the relative contribution of cognitive and behavioral  factors in addition to physical or developmental factors. 

Parental consent must be obtained by the Charter School prior to conducting an initial  evaluation to determine if the child qualifies as a child with a disability, and before providing  special education and related services to the child. Parental consent for an evaluation shall not  be construed as consent for their child to receive special education and related services. The  screening of a child by a teacher or specialist to determine appropriate instructional strategies  for curriculum implementation is not considered to be an evaluation for eligibility for special  education and related services; therefore, parental consent is not required in this instance. 

The law contains additional provisions and due process protections regarding situations in  which parental consent for an initial evaluation is absent or refused. This is discussed more  fully below and in the PaTTAN Procedural Safeguards Notice. If you have any questions about 
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where to obtain a copy of the PaTTAN Procedural Safeguards Notice, kindly contact the Chief  Executive Officer or his/her designee at (484) 875-5400​. 

The evaluation process is conducted by a Multi-Disciplinary Team (“MDT”), which is formed  based on the student’s needs and includes a teacher, other qualified professionals who work  with the child, the parents and other members as required by law. The Multi-Disciplinary  Evaluation (“MDE”) process must be conducted in accordance with specific timelines and must  include protective procedures. For example, tests and procedures used as part of the  Multi-Disciplinary Evaluation may not be racially or culturally biased. 

The MDE process culminates with a written report called an Evaluation Report (“ER”). This  report makes recommendations about a student’s eligibility for special education based on the  presence of a disability and the need for specially designed instruction. 

Parents who think their child is eligible for special education may request, at any time, that the  Charter School conduct a Multi-Disciplinary Evaluation. ​Requests for a Multi-Disciplinary  Evaluation must be made in writing to the Chief Executive Officer or his/her designee. 

If a parent makes an oral request for a Multi-Disciplinary Evaluation, the Charter School shall  provide the parent with a form(s) for that purpose. If the public school denies the parents’  request for an evaluation, the parents have the right to challenge the denial through an  impartial hearing or through voluntary alternative dispute resolution such as mediation. 

Reevaluations are conducted if the Charter School determines that the educational or related  services’ needs, including improved academic achievement and functional performance, of the  child warrant a reevaluation; or if the child’s parent or teacher requests a reevaluation. A  reevaluation may occur not more than once a year, unless the parent and the Charter School  agree otherwise; and must occur at least once every 3 years, unless the parent and the Charter  School agree that a reevaluation is unnecessary. Students with an intellectual disability must be  reevaluated at least once every two years under State law. 

Educational Placement  The determination of whether a student is eligible for special education is made by an IEP team.  The IEP team includes: the parents of a child with a disability; not less than one regular  education teacher, if the child is, or may be, participating in the regular education environment;  not less than one special education teacher, or when appropriate, not less than one special  education provider; a representative of the Charter School who is qualified to provide or  supervise the provision of specially designed instruction to meet the unique needs of children  with disabilities, is knowledgeable about the general education curriculum, and is  knowledgeable about the availability of resources of the Charter School; an individual who can  interpret the instructional implications of evaluation results, who may be a member of the team  described above; other individuals, at the discretion of the parent or the agency, who have  knowledge or special expertise regarding the child, including related services personnel as  appropriate; and whenever appropriate, a child with a disability. 
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Additionally, the Charter School must invite the child with a disability to attend the child’s IEP  Team meeting if a purpose of the meeting includes the consideration of the postsecondary goals  for the child and the transition services needed to assist the child in reaching those goals. If the  child does not attend the IEP Team meeting, the Charter School must take other steps to ensure  that the child’s preferences and interests are considered. IEP team participation is directly  addressed by IDEA regulations. 

If the student is determined to be eligible for special education, the IEP team develops a written  education plan called an IEP. The IEP shall be based in part on the results of the  Multi-Disciplinary Evaluation. When the IEP team decides that a student is not eligible for  special education, recommendations for educational programming in regular education may be  developed from the Evaluation Report (ER). 

Placement must be made in the “least restrictive environment”, as described more fully above,  in which the student’s needs can be met with special education and related services. All  students with disabilities must be educated to the maximum extent appropriate with children  who are not disabled. 

Parents and Surrogate Parents  For purposes of this Notice, the Charter School considers parents to be biological or adoptive  parents of a child; a foster parent; a guardian generally authorized to act as the child’s parent, or  authorized to make educational decisions for the child; an individual acting in the place of a  biological or adoptive parent (including a grandparent, stepparent, or other relative) with  whom the child lives, or an individual who is legally responsible for the child’s welfare; or a  surrogate parent. 

A surrogate parent must be appointed when no parent can be identified; a public agency, after  reasonable efforts, cannot locate a parent; the child is a ward of the State under the laws of  Pennsylvania, or the child is an unaccompanied homeless youth as defined by the  McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. Sec. 11434a(6). A person selected as a  surrogate parent must not be an employee of the SEA, the Charter School, or any other agency  that is involved in the education or care of the child; has no personal or professional interest  that conflicts with the interest of the child the surrogate parent represents; and has knowledge  and skills that ensure adequate representation of the child. The surrogate parent may represent  the child in all matters relating to the identification, evaluation, and educational placement of  the child and the provision of FAPE to the child. Reasonable efforts must be made to ensure the  assignment of a surrogate parent not more than 30 days after it is determined that the child  needs a surrogate parent. 

Prior Written Notice  The Charter School will notify the parent within a reasonable time before the Charter School  before the Charter School takes the following action(s), pursuant to the Notice of Recommended  Educational Placement/Prior Written Notice (“NOREP/PWN”) regarding the child’s  educational program. For more information, see the annotated NOREP/PWN on the PaTTAN 
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website or available at the Charter School office.: 

A) Proposes to initiate or to change the identification, evaluation, or educational placement  of the child, or the provision of a free appropriate public education (“FAPE”) to the  child; ​or  B) Refuses to initiate or to change the identification, evaluation, or educational placement  of the child, or the provision of FAPE to the child; or 
C) Changes placement of child for disciplinary reasons; or 
D) Initiates a Due process hearing, or an expedited due process hearing; or 
E) Graduates child from the Charter School; or 
F) Exits child from special education; or 
G) Exits child from the Charter School due to exceeding the age eligibility for FAPE; or 
H) Refuses to change the identification, evaluation or FAPE of the child; or 
I) Implements Extended School Year (ESY) services; or 
J) Responds to a request for an independent educational evaluation (“IEE”) at public  expense.    In Pennsylvania, prior written notice is provided by means of a Prior Written Notice                             Form/Notice of Recommended Educational Placement (“NOREP”). You should be given                     reasonable notice of this proposal or refusal so that if you do not agree with the Charter School                                     you may take appropriate action. Reasonable Notice means ten (10) days. 

The prior written notice must: 

A) Describe the action that the Charter School proposes or refuses to take; 
B) Explain why the Charter School is proposing or refusing to take the action; 
C) Describe each evaluation procedure, assessment, record, or report the Charter School  used in deciding to propose or refuse the action; 
D) Include a statement that you have protections under the procedural safeguards  provisions in Part B of IDEA; 
E) Tell how you can obtain a description of the procedural safeguards if the action that the  Charter School is proposing or refusing is not an initial referral for evaluation; 
F) Include resources for you to contact for help in understanding Part B of the IDEA; 
G) Describe any other choices that your child’s IEP Team considered and the reasons why  those choices were rejected; and 
H) Provide a description of other reasons why the Charter School proposed or refused the  action. 

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The notice must be: 

A) Written in language understandable to the general public; and 
B) Provided in your native language or other mode of communication you use, unless it is  clearly not feasible to do so. 
C) If your native language or other mode of communication is not a written language, the  Charter School will ensure that: 
D) The notice is translated for you orally or by other means in your native language or  other mode of communication; 
E) You understand the content of the notice; and 
F) There is written evidence that A) and B) above have been met. 


Native language, when used with an individual who has limited English proficiency, means the  following: 

A) The language normally used by that person, or, in the case of a child, the language  normally used by the child’s parents;  B) In all direct contact with a child (including evaluation of a child), the language normally  used by the child in the home or learning environment. 


For a person with deafness or blindness, or for a person with no written language, the mode of  communication is what the person normally uses (such as sign language, Braille, or oral  communication). 

Parental Consent  Consent means (34 CFR §300.9): 

A) The parent has been fully informed of all information relevant to the activity for which  consent is sought, in his or her native language, or through another mode of  communication; 
B) The parent understands and agrees, in writing, to the carrying out of the activity for  which his or her consent is sought, and the consent describes that activity and lists the  record (if any) that will be released and to whom; and 
C) The parent understands that the granting of consent is voluntary on the part of the  parent and may be revoked at any time. 


If a parent revokes consent, that revocation is not retroactive (i.e., it does ​not ​​negate an action  that has occurred after the consent was given and before the consent was revoked). 

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If the parent revokes consent in writing for their child’s receipt of special education services  after the child is initially provided special education and related services, the Charter School is  not ​​required to amend the child’s education records to remove any references to the child’s  receipt of special education and related services because of the revocation of consent.  WHEN IS PARENTAL CONSENT NEEDED?  Parental consent is needed in the following instances:  1. When the Charter School proposes to initiate the provision of special education services  to the child; and,   2. When the Charter School seeks to evaluate or re-evaluate the child.  Initial Evaluations  the Charter School cannot conduct an initial evaluation of a child to determine whether they are  eligible under Part B of the IDEA to receive special education and related services without first  providing parents with prior written notice of the proposed action and without obtaining  parental consent as described above, under the heading Parental Consent. 

Charter School will make reasonable efforts to obtain parents informed consent for an initial  evaluation to decide whether the child is a child with a disability. Parental consent for initial  evaluation does not mean that parent has also given consent to start providing special education  and related services to the child. If parent has refused to provide consent or failed to respond to  a request to provide consent for an initial evaluation, the Charter School may, but is not  required to, seek to conduct an initial evaluation of the child by utilizing mediation or due  process complaint, resolution meeting, and impartial due process hearing procedures. The  Charter School will not violate obligations to locate, identify, and evaluate the child if an  evaluation of the child is not pursued in these circumstances. 

Special rules for Initial Evaluation of Wards of the State  Under Pennsylvania law, 34 CFR § 300.45 if a child is designated a ward of the state, the  whereabouts of the parent are not known or the rights of the parent have been terminated in  accordance with State law. Therefore, someone other than the parent has been designated to  make educational decisions for the child. 

For initial evaluations only, if the child is a ward of the State and is not residing with the child's  parent, the Charter School is not required to obtain informed consent from the parent for an  initial evaluation to determine whether the child is a child with a disability if: 

A) Despite reasonable efforts to do so, the public agency cannot discover the whereabouts  of the parent of the child; 
B) The rights of the parents of the child have been terminated in accordance with State law;  or 
C) The rights of the parent to make educational decisions have been subrogated by a judge  in accordance with State law and consent for an initial evaluation has been given by an  individual appointed by the judge to represent the child. 


Consent for an initial evaluation should, therefore, be obtained from the individual so 
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designated to make educational decisions for the child. 

Ward of the State, as used in the IDEA, encompasses other categories, so as to include a child  who is: 

A) A foster child who does not have a foster parent; 
B) Considered a ward of the State under State law; or 
C) In the custody of a public child welfare agency. 


Initial Placement in Special Education  Charter School must obtain informed parental consent before providing special education and  related services to a child for the first time. The Charter School must make reasonable efforts to  obtain informed parental consent before providing special education and related services to a  child for the first time. 

If parents do not respond to a request to provide consent for their child to receive special  education and related services for the first time, or if parents refuse to give such consent, the  Charter School may not use the procedural safeguards (i.e. mediation, due process complaint,  resolution meeting, or an impartial due process hearing) in order to obtain agreement or a  ruling that the special education and related services as recommended by the child’s IEP Team  may be provided to the child without parental consent. 

If parents refuse to give consent for their child to start receiving special education and related  services, or if they do not respond to a request to provide such consent and the Charter School  does not provide the child with the special education and related services for which consent is  sought, the Charter School: 

A) Is not in violation of the requirement to make FAPE available to the child for its failure  to provide those services to the child; and 
B) Is not required to have an IEP meeting or develop an IEP for the child for the special  education and related services for which consent was requested. 


Reevaluations  The Charter School must obtain informed parental consent before a child is reevaluated, unless: 

A) Charter School took reasonable steps to obtain parental consent of a child’s reevaluation;  and 
B) Parent did not respond. 
Parental consent is ​not​​ ​​required before: 

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A) Reviewing existing data as part of an evaluation or a reevaluation; or 
B) Administering a test or other evaluation that is administered to all children unless,  before administration of that test or evaluation, consent is required of parents of all  children. 

If parents refuse to consent to their child’s reevaluation, the Charter School may, but is not  required to, pursue the child’s reevaluation by using the mediation, due process complaint,  resolution meeting, and impartial due process hearing procedures to seek to override parental  refusal to consent to a child’s reevaluation. As with initial evaluations, the Charter School will  not violate obligations under Part B of the IDEA if it declines to pursue the reevaluation in this  manner. 
The Charter School may ​not​​ ​​use parental refusal to consent to one service or activity in order to  deny parents or their children any other service, benefit, or activity.  WHAT EFFORTS WILL CHARTER SCHOOL MAKE TO OBTAIN PARENTAL CONSENT? 

the Charter School will take steps to ensure that one or both of the parents of a child with a  disability are present at each IEP Team meeting or are afforded the opportunity to participate,  including: 

A) Notifying parents of the meeting early enough to ensure that they will have the  opportunity to attend; and 
B) Scheduling the meeting at a mutually agreed upon time and place. 
If the Charter School is unable to convince parents to attend an IEP Team meeting, the meeting  may still be conducted; however, the Charter School must maintain documentation of  reasonable efforts to obtain parental consent for initial evaluations, to provide special education  and related services for the first time, for reevaluation and to locate parents of wards of the State  for initial evaluations. The documentation will include a record of attempts in these areas, such  as: 

A) Detailed records of telephone calls made or attempted and the results of those calls;   B) Copies of correspondence sent to the parents and any responses received; and  C) Detailed records of visits made to the parent’s home or place of employment and the  results of those visits. 


Disagreements with an Evaluation    A) General 
1) As described below, parents have the right to obtain an independent educational  evaluation (IEE) of their child if they disagree with the evaluation of their child that was  obtained by the Charter School. The Charter School must provide parents who request  an IEE with information about where they may obtain an IEE and about the Charter 
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School’s criteria that apply to IEEs. 
B) Definitions 
1) Independent educational evaluation means an evaluation conducted by a  qualified examiner who is not employed by the Charter School and  responsible for the education of the child in question.  2) Public expense means that the Charter School either pays for the full cost  of the evaluation or ensures that the evaluation is otherwise provided at  no cost to parent, consistent with the provisions of Part B of the IDEA,  which allow each State to use whatever State, local, Federal and private  sources of support are available in the State to meet the requirements of  Part B of the Act.      C) Parent right to evaluation at public expense    1) A parent has the right to an IEE at the public expense if the parent  disagrees with an evaluation obtained by the Charter School, subject to  the following conditions:  2) If a parent requests an IEE at public expense, the public agency must,  without unnecessary delay, either:    a) File a due process complaint to request a hearing to show that its  evaluation is appropriate; or  b) Provide an IEE is provided at public expense, unless the Charter  School demonstrates in a hearing that the evaluation obtained by  the parent did not meet the Charter School criteria.  c) If Charter School files a due process complaint notice to request a  hearing and the final decision is that the Charter School’s  evaluation is appropriate, the parent still has the right to an  independent educational evaluation, but not at public expense.    If a parent requests an IEE, Charter School may ask for the parent’s reason why he or she objects  to the public evaluation. However, the Charter School may not require the parent to provide an  explanation and may not unreasonably delay either providing the IEE at public expense or  filing a due process complaint to request a due process hearing to defend the public evaluation.  A parent is entitled to only one IEE at public expense each time Charter School conducts an  evaluation with which the parent disagrees. 


D) Parent-Initiated Evaluations 
1) If a parent obtains an IEE at public expense or shares an evaluation with the  Charter School that was obtained at private expense, the results of the evaluation: 
a) Must be considered by Charter School, if it meets Charter School criteria, in any  decision made with respect to the provision of FAPE to the child; and 
b) May be presented by any party as evidence at a due process hearing regarding 
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the child. 


E) Charter School Criteria 
1) If an IEE is conducted at public expense, the criteria under which the evaluation  is obtained, including the location of the evaluation and the qualifications of the  examiner, must be the same as the criteria that the Charter School uses when it  initiates an evaluation, to the extent those criteria are consistent with the parent’s  right to an IEE. 


2) Except for the criteria described above, Charter School may not impose  conditions or timelines related to obtaining an IEE at public expense. 


F) Requests for evaluations by hearing officers 
1) If a hearing officer requests an IEE of your child as part of a due process hearing,  the cost of the evaluation must be at public expense. 

ANNUAL NOTICE OF RIGHTS REGARDING STUDENT RECORDS: CONSENT FOR  DISCLOSURE OF PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION (34 CFR §300.622) 

Unless the information is contained in education records, and the disclosure is authorized  without parental consent under FERPA, parental consent must be obtained before personally  identifiable information is disclosed to parties other than officials of participating agencies.  Except under the circumstances specified below, parental consent is not required before  personally identifiable Part B of the IDEA. 

Parental consent, or consentofaneligiblechildwhohasreachedtheageofmajorityunderState                                   law, must be obtained before personally identifiable information is released to officials of                           participating agencies providing or paying for transition services. 

ACCESS TO CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION RELATED TO STUDENT (34 CFR §300.611) 

A) Related to the confidentiality of information, the following definitions apply: 
1) Destruction
​ means physical destruction or removal of personal identifiers from                    information so that the information is no longer personally identifiable. 
2) Education records
​ means the type of records covered under the definition of  “education records” in 34 CFR Part 99 (the regulations implementing FERPA). 
3) Participating agency
​ means any Charter School, agency or institution that collects,                      maintains, or uses personally identifiable information, or from which                   information is obtained, under Part B of the IDEA. 
4) Personally identifiable
​ (34 CFR § 300.32) means information that has: 
a) The name of the child, the child’s parent, or other family member; 
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b) The address of the child; 
c) A personal identifier, such as the child’s social security number or  student number; or 
d) A list of personal characteristics or other information that would make it  possible to identify the child with reasonable certainty. 


B) Parent Access Rights (34 CFR §300.613) 
 
1) Charter School must permit parents to inspect and review any education  records relating to their child that is collected, maintained, or used by  Charter School under Part B of the IDEA. The Charter School must  comply with such parental request without unnecessary delay and  before any meeting regarding an IEP, or hearing pursuant to 34 CFR §  507 (relating to due process complaints); 34 CFR § 530 (relating to  discipline); 34 CFR § 531 (relating to an interim alternative educational  setting for services); 34 CFR § 532 (relating to Appeals); or a resolution  session pursuant to 34 CFR § 300.510, and in no case more than 45  calendar days after a parental request has been made.    2) The parental right to inspect and review education records includes:    a) The right to a response from the Charter School to reasonable  requests for explanations and interpretations of the records;  b) The right to request that the Charter School provide copies of the records  containing the information if failure to provide those copies would review  the records; and    c) The right to have a representative of the parent inspect and review the  records. 
C) the Charter School may presume that parent has authority to inspect and review records  relating to their child unless advised that the parent does not have the authority under  applicable State law governing such matters as guardianship, or separation and divorce. 
1) If any education ​record includes information on more than one child​​, the  parents of those children have the right to inspect and review only the  information relating to their child or to be informed of that specific information. 
2) On request, the Charter School must provide parent with a list of the types and  locations of education records collected, maintained, or used by the Charter  School. 

D) Other Authorized Access (34 CFR §300.614) 
1) The Charter School must keep a record of parties obtaining access to education  records collected, maintained, or used under Part B of the IDEA (except access by 
  Annual Special Education Notice 18-19 Page 17 


parents and authorized employees of the participating agency), including the  name of the party, the date access was given, and the purpose for which the  party is authorized to use the records. 
E) Fees (34 CFR §300.617) 
1) The Charter School may charge a fee for copies of records that are made for  parents under Part B of the IDEA, if the fee does not effectively prevent parents  from exercising their right to inspect and review those records. The Charter  School may not charge a fee to search for or to retrieve information under Part B  of the IDEA.  F) Amendment of Records at Parent’s Request (34 CFR §300.618) 
1) A parent who believes that information in the education records regarding their  child collected, maintained, or used under Part B of the IDEA is inaccurate,  misleading, or violates the privacy or other rights of the child, may request the  Charter School to amend the information. The Charter School must decide  whether to amend the information in accordance with the request within a  reasonable period of time of receipt of the request. If the Charter School refuses  to amend the information in accordance with the request, it must inform the  parent of the refusal and advise the parent of the right to a hearing for this  purpose. 
G) Opportunity for a Records Hearing (34 CFR §300.619) Charter School must, on request,  provide parents an opportunity for to challenge information in education records  regarding their child to ensure that it is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in  violation of the privacy or other rights of the child. 
1) Hearing Procedures (34 CFR §300.621) A hearing to challenge information in  education records must be conducted according to the following procedures for  such hearings under FERPA, 34 CFR § 99.22: 
a) The educational agency or institution shall hold the hearing within a  reasonable time after it has received the request for the hearing from the  parent or eligible student. 
b) The educational agency or institution shall give the parent or eligible  student notice of the date, time, and place, reasonably in advance of the  hearing. 
c) The hearing may be conducted by any individual, including an official of  the educational agency or institution, who does not have a direct interest  in the outcome of the hearing. 
d) The educational agency or institution shall give the parent or eligible  student a full and fair opportunity to present evidence to challenge the  content of the student’s education records on the grounds that the  information contained in the education records is inaccurate, misleading,  or in violation of the privacy rights of the student. The parent or eligible  student may, at their own expense, be assisted or represented by one or  more individuals of his or her own choice, including an attorney. 

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e) The educational agency or institution shall make its decision in writing  within a reasonable period of time after the hearing. 
f) The decision must be based solely on the evidence presented at the  hearing, and must include a summary of the evidence and the reasons for  the decision. 
H) Result of Hearing (34 CFR §300.620) If, as a result of the hearing, the Charter School  decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the  privacy or other rights of the child, it must amend the information accordingly and  inform the parent in writing. If, as a result of the hearing, the Charter School decides  that the information is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the  privacy or other rights of the child, the Charter School must inform parent of their right  to place in the records a statement commenting on the information or providing any  reasons for disagreeing with the decision of the participating charter school. Such an  explanation placed in the child’s records must: 
1) Be maintained by the Charter School as part of the records of the child as long as  the record or contested portion is maintained by the Charter School; and  2) If the Charter School discloses the records of the child or the challenged portion  to any party, the explanation must also be disclosed to that party.   

I) Safeguards (34 CFR §300.623) 
1) Charter School must protect the confidentiality of personally identifiable  information at collection, storage, disclosure, and destruction stages. One official  at the Charter School must assume responsibility for ensuring the confidentiality  of any personally identifiable information. All persons collecting or using  personally identifiable information must receive training or instruction regarding  State policies and procedures regarding confidentiality under Part B of the IDEA  and FERPA. The Charter School must maintain, for public inspection, a current  listing of the names and positions of those employees within the Charter School  who may have access to personally identifiable information. 


J) Destruction of Information (34 CFR §300.624) 
1) The Charter School must inform parents when personally identifiable  information collected, maintained, or used is no longer needed to provide  educational services to the child, and the information must be destroyed at the  request of parents. However, a permanent record of the child’s name, address,  and phone number, his or her grades, attendance record, classes attended, grade  level completed, and year completed may be maintained without time limitation. 

PROCEDURES FOR DISCIPLINARY EXCLUSION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES. 

There are special rules in Pennsylvania for excluding children with disabilities for disciplinary  reasons: 
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AUTHORITY OF SCHOOL PERSONNEL (34 CFR §300.530) 

Case-by-Case Determination  Charter School personnel may consider any unique circumstances on a case-by-case basis when  determining whether a change of placement, made in accordance with the following  requirements related to discipline, is appropriate for a child with a disability who violates a  school code of student conduct. 

General  To the extent that they also take such action for children without disabilities, school personnel  may, for not more than ​10 consecutive school days​​, remove a child with a disability who  violates a code of student conduct from his or her current placement to an appropriate interim  alternative educational setting, another setting, or suspension. School personnel may also  impose additional removals of the child of not more than ​10 consecutive school days ​​in that  same school year for separate incidents of misconduct, as long as those removals do not  constitute a change of placement (see ​Change of Placement Because of Disciplinary Removals  for the definition, below) or ​exceed fifteen (15) cumulative school days in a school year​​. Once  a child with a disability has been removed from his or her current placement for a total of ​10  school days ​​in the same school year, the Charter School must, during any subsequent days of  removal in that school year, provide services to the extent required below under the  sub-heading ​Services ​​ . 

Additional Authority  If the behavior that violated the student code of conduct was not a manifestation of the child’s  disability (see ​Manifestation determination

​ , below) and the disciplinary change of placement  would exceed ​10 consecutive school days​​, the Charter School may apply the disciplinary  procedures to that child with a disability in the same manner and for the same duration as it  would to children without disabilities, except that the school must provide services to that child  as described below under ​Services ​​ . The child’s IEP Team may determine the interim alternative  educational setting for such services. Under PA special education regulations, a disciplinary  exclusion of a student with a disability for ​more than 10 cumulative school days ​​in a school  year can be considered a pattern so as to be deemed a change in educational placement  (explained under ​Change of Placement Because of Disciplinary Removals ​​ ). The Charter School  is required to issue a NOREP/Prior Written Notice to parents prior to a removal that constitutes  a change in placement (removal for more than 10 consecutive days or more than 15 cumulative  days). 

Services  The services that must be provided to a child with a disability who has been removed from the  child’s current placement may be provided in an interim alternative educational setting. A the  Charter School is only required to provide services to a child with a disability who has been  removed from his or her current placement for ​10 school days or less ​​in that school year, if it 
  Annual Special Education Notice 18-19 Page 20 


provides services to a child without disabilities who has been similarly removed. Students may  have the responsibility to make up exams and work missed while being disciplined by  suspension and may be permitted to complete these assignments within guidelines established  by the Charter School.    A child with a disability who is removed from the child’s current placement for ​more than 10  consecutive school days ​​must:    A) Continue to receive educational services, so as to enable the child to continue to  participate in the general education curriculum, although in another setting, and to  progress toward meeting the goals set out in the child’s IEP; and    B) Receive, as appropriate, a functional behavioral assessment, and behavioral intervention  services and modifications that are designed to address the behavior violation so that it  does not happen again. 
After a child with a disability has been removed from his or her current placement for 10 school  days during one school year, if the current removal is for not more than 10 consecutive school  days and is not a change of placement (see definition below), ​ ​​then​​ ​​school personnel, in  consultation with at least one of the child’s teachers, determine the extent to which services are  needed to enable the child to continue to participate in the general education curriculum,  although in another setting, and to progress toward meeting the goals set out in the child’s IEP. 

If the removal is a change of placement (see definition below), the child’s IEP Team will  determine the appropriate services to enable the child to continue to participate in the general  education curriculum, although in another setting, and to progress toward meeting the goals set  out in the child’s IEP.    Manifestation Determination  Within ​10 school days ​​of any decision to change the placement of a child with a disability  because of a violation of a code of student conduct, the Charter School, the parent, and relevant  members of the IEP Team (as determined by the parent and the Charter School) must review all  relevant information in the student’s file, including the child’s IEP, any teacher observations,  and any relevant information provided by the parents to determine: 

A) If the conduct in question was caused by, or had a direct and substantial relationship to,  the child’s disability; or 
B) If the conduct in question was the direct result of the Charter School’s failure to  implement the child’s IEP. 
If the Charter School, the parent, and relevant members of the child’s IEP Team determine that  either of those conditions was met, the conduct must be determined to be a manifestation of the  child’s disability.    If the Charter School, the parent, and relevant members of the child’s IEP Team determine that  the conduct in question was the direct result of the Charter School’s failure to implement the 
  Annual Special Education Notice 18-19 Page 21 


IEP, the Charter School must take immediate action to remedy those deficiencies. 

Determination that behavior was a manifestation of the child’s disability  If the Charter School, the parent, and relevant members of the IEP Team determine that the  conduct was a manifestation of the child’s disability, the IEP Team must either: 

A) Conduct a functional behavioral assessment, unless the Charter School had conducted a  functional behavioral assessment before the behavior that resulted in the change of  placement occurred, and implement a behavioral intervention plan for the child; or 
B) If a behavioral intervention plan already has been developed, review the behavioral  intervention plan, and modify it, as necessary, to address the behavior. 


Except as described below under the sub-heading ​Special Circumstances​​, the Charter School  must return the child to the placement from which the child was removed, unless the parent  and the Charter School agree to a change of placement as part of the modification of the  behavioral intervention plan. 

Special Circumstances  Whether or not the behavior was a manifestation of the child’s disability, School personnel may  remove a student to an interim alternative educational setting (determined by the child’s IEP  Team) for up to 45 school days, if the child: 

A) Carries a weapon (see the Definitions​ ​​below) to school or possesses a weapon at school,  on school premises, or to or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the Charter  School; 
B) Knowingly possesses or uses illegal drugs (see the ​Definitions​​ ​​below), or sells or  solicits the sale of a controlled substance, (see the ​ ​​Definitions​​ ​​below), while at school,  on school premises, or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the Charter School;  or     C) Has inflicted serious bodily injury (see the Definitions​ ​​below) upon another person  while at school, on school premises, or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the  Charter School. 


Definitions 

A) Controlled substance
​ means a drug or other substance identified under schedules I, II, III,  IV, or V in section 202 (c) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812(c)). 
B) Illegal drug
​ means a controlled substance; but does not include a controlled substance  that is legally possessed or used under the supervision of a licensed health-care  professional or that is legally possessed or used under any other authority under that  Act or under any other provision of Federal law. 

  Annual Special Education Notice 18-19 Page 22 


C) Serious bodily injury
​ has the meaning given the term “serious bodily injury” under  paragraph (3) of subsection (h) of section 1365 of title 18, United States Code. 
D) Weapon
​ has the meaning given the term “dangerous weapon” under paragraph (2) of the  first subsection (g) of section 930 of title 18, United States Code. 

Notification  On the date it makes the decision to make a removal that is a change of placement of the child  with a disability because of a violation of a code of student conduct, the Charter School must  notify the parents of that decision, and provide the parents with a Procedural Safeguards  Notice.   
Change of Placement Because Of Disciplinary Removals (34 CFR §300.536)  A removal of a child with a disability from the child’s current educational placement is a  change of placement ​​requiring a NOREP/prior written notice if:    A) The removal is for more than 10 consecutive school days; or 
B) The removal is for 15 cumulative school days total in any one school year;  
C) The child has been subjected to a series of removals that constitute a pattern because: 
1) The series of removals total more than 10 school days in a school year; 
2) The child’s behavior is substantially similar to the child’s behavior in previous  incidents that resulted in a series of removals; ​and  3) Because of such additional factors as the length of each removal, the total amount  of time the child has been removed, and the proximity of the removals to one  another. 
Whether a pattern of removals constitutes a change of placement is determined on a  case-by-case basis by the Charter School and, if challenged, is subject to review through due  process and judicial proceedings. 

Determination of Setting (34 CFR §300.531)  The child’s IEP Team must determine the interim alternative educational setting for removals  that are ​changes of placement​​, and removals under the heading ​Special circumstances ​​ , above.    Appeal (34 CFR §300.532) 
A) The parent of a child with a disability may file a due process complaint to request a due  process hearing if he or she disagrees with: 
1) Any decision regarding placement made under the discipline provisions; or 
2) The manifestation determination described above. 


The Charter School may file a due process complaint to request a due process hearing if it 
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believes that maintaining the current placement of the child is substantially likely to result in  injury to the child or to others.    Authority of Hearing Officer  An impartial hearing officer must conduct the due process hearing and make a decision. The  hearing officer may: 
A) Return the child with a disability to the placement from which the child was removed if  the hearing officer determines that the removal was a violation of the requirements  described under the heading ​Authority of School Personnel
​ , or that the child’s behavior  was a manifestation of the child’s disability; or 
B) Order a change of placement of the child with a disability to an appropriate interim  alternative educational setting for not more than 45 school days if the hearing officer  determines that maintaining the current placement of the child is substantially likely to  result in injury to the child or to others.    These hearing procedures may be repeated, if the Charter School believes that returning the  child to the original placement is substantially likely to result in injury to the child or to others.  Whenever a parent or the Charter School files a due process complaint to request such a  hearing, a hearing must be held in accordance with the following: 

A) The Charter School must arrange for an expedited due process hearing, which must  occur within ​20​ school days of the date the hearing is filed and must result in a  determination within ​10​ school days after the hearing.  B) Unless the parents and Charter School agree in writing to waive the resolution meeting,  or agree to use mediation, a resolution meeting must occur within ​7​ calendar days of  receiving notice of the due process complaint. The hearing may proceed unless the  matter has been resolved to the satisfaction of both parties within ​15​ calendar days of  receipt of the due process complaint. 


A party may appeal the decision in an expedited due process hearing in the same way as they  may for decisions in other due process hearings.    Placement During Appeals (34 CFR §300.533)  When the parent or the Charter School has filed a due process complaint related to disciplinary  matters, the child must (unless the parent and the Charter School agree otherwise) remain in the  interim alternative educational setting pending the decision of the hearing officer, or until the  expiration of the time period specified in 34 CFR §300.530(c) or (g) l, whichever occurs first,  unless the parent and the Charter School agree otherwise. 

Special Rules for Students with an Intellectual Disability    The disciplinary removal of a child with an intellectual disability attending the Charter School  for any amount of time is considered a change in placement under 22 Pa. Code §14.143 and 
  Annual Special Education Notice 18-19 Page 24 


requires NOREP/prior written notice (if the disciplinary event ​does not​ involve drugs, weapons  and/or serious bodily injury). A removal from school is not a change in placement for a child  who is identified with an intellectual disability when the disciplinary event involves weapons,  drugs, and/or serious bodily injury. 

According to certain assurances the Commonwealth entered into related to the PARC consent  decree, a the Charter School may suspend, on a limited basis, a student with an intellectual  disability who presents a danger to himself or others upon application and approval by the  Bureau of Special Education and only to the extent that a student with a disability other than an  intellectual disability could be suspended. 

Protections For Children Not Yet Eligible For Special Education and Related Services (34  CFR §300.534)  A child who has not been determined to be eligible for special education and related services  and who has engaged in behavior that violated a code of student conduct, may assert any of the  protections provided for a child with a disability if the Charter School had knowledge that the  child was a child with a disability before the behavior that precipitated the disciplinary action.  

Basis of Knowledge for Disciplinary Matters  The Charter School must be deemed to have knowledge that a child is a child with a disability  if, before the behavior that brought about the disciplinary action occurred: 

A) The parent of the child expressed concern in writing that the child is in need of special  education and related services to supervisory or administrative personnel of the Charter  School, or a teacher of the child; 
B) The parent requested an evaluation related to eligibility for special education and  related services under Part B of the IDEA; ​or  C) The child’s teacher, or other Charter School personnel expressed specific concerns about  a pattern of behavior demonstrated by the child directly to the Charter School’s Chief  Executive Officer or his/her designee or to other supervisory personnel of the Charter  School. 


Exception  The Charter School would not be deemed to have such knowledge if:  The child’s parent has not allowed an evaluation of the child or refused special education  services; or the child has been evaluated and determined to not be a child with a disability  under Part B of the IDEA. 

  Conditions that apply if there is no basis of knowledge  If, prior to taking disciplinary measures against the child, the Charter School does not have  knowledge that a child is a child with a disability, as described above under the sub-headings  Basis of knowledge for disciplinary matters

​ and ​Exception ​​ , the child may be subjected to the 
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disciplinary measures that are applied to children without disabilities who engaged in  comparable behaviors. However, if a request is made for an evaluation of a child during the  time in which the child is subjected to disciplinary measures, the evaluation must be conducted  in an expedited manner. Until the evaluation is completed, the child remains in the educational  placement determined by School authorities, which can include suspension or expulsion  without educational services. If the child is determined to be a child with a disability, taking  into consideration information from the evaluation conducted by the Charter School and  information provided by the parents, the Charter School must provide special education and  related services in accordance with Part B of the IDEA, including the disciplinary requirements  described above. 

REFERRAL TO AND ACTION BY LAW ENFORCEMENT AND JUDICIAL AUTHORITIES  (34 CFR §300.535)    A) The state and federal regulations do not: 
1) Prohibit an agency from reporting a crime committed by a child with a disability  to appropriate authorities; ​or  2) Prevent State law enforcement and judicial authorities from exercising their  responsibilities with regard to the application of Federal and State law to crimes  committed by a child with a disability.    Transmittal of records  If the Charter School reports a crime committed by a child with a disability, the Charter School  must ensure that copies of the child’s special education and disciplinary records are transmitted  for consideration by the authorities to whom the Charter School reports the crime ​and​ may  transmit copies of the child’s special education and disciplinary records only to the extent  permitted by FERPA. 

THIS ANNUAL NOTICE AND STATEMENT OF POLICY AND PROCEDURES HAS BEEN  WRITTEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 711 OF TITLE 22 OF THE PA CODE AND  INCORPORATED INFORMATION FROM APPLICABLE PDE AND STATE FORMS AND  SOURCES INCLUDING THE PATTAN PROCEDURAL SAFEGUARDS NOTICE. 

THE CONTENT OF THIS NOTICE HAS BEEN WRITTEN IN STRAIGHTFORWARD,  SIMPLE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. IF A PERSON DOES NOT UNDERSTAND ANY OF  THIS NOTICE, HE OR SHE SHOULD ASK THE DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL EDUCATION  OF CHARTER SCHOOL FOR AN EXPLANATION. CHARTER SCHOOL WILL ARRANGE  FOR AN INTERPRETER FOR PARENTS WITH LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY. IF A  PARENT IS DEAF OR BLIND OR HAS NO WRITTEN LANGUAGE, CHARTER SCHOOL  WILL ARRANGE FOR OTHER COMMUNICATION (E.G., SIGN LANGUAGE, BRAILLE,  OR ORAL COMMUNICATION). 
THIS NOTICE IS ONLY A ​​SUMMARY​​ OF THE SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES, 
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EVALUATION AND SCREENING ACTIVITIES, AND RIGHTS AND  PROTECTIONS PERTAINING TO CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES, CHILDREN  THOUGHT TO BE DISABLED, AND THEIR PARENTS AND IS ONLY A SUMMARY OF  THE CONFIDENTIALITY RIGHTS REGARDING STUDENT INFORMATION. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REQUEST EVALUATION OR SCREENING OF A  CHARTER SCHOOL STUDENT CONTACT THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF THE  CHARTER SCHOOL AT OR HIS/HER​​ DESIGNEE 126 WALLACE AVE, DOWNINGTOWN,  PA 19335, (484) 875-5400. 

NOTHING IN THIS NOTICE IS INTENDED TO CONFLICT WITH OR SUPPLANT THE  INFORMATION CONTAINED IN PDE’S CURRENT “PROCEDURAL SAFEGUARDS  NOTICE”​​ ​​WHICH IS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE CHARTER SCHOOL FOR  PARENTS/GUARDIANS TO REVIEW. NOTHING IN THIS NOTICE IS INTENDED TO  CONFLICT WITH​​ ​​OR SUPPLANT APPLICABLE STATE AND/OR FEDERAL LAWS.
Click the link below to download the full Child Find Policy Notice in PDF format.